Website Tour: Suzanne Collins

Over the past several weeks, I’ve discussed some of the best practices for author websites.  Along the way, I’ve taken a sampling of author websites and identified what works and what does not work about their sites.  A few weeks ago, I kicked this off with E L James, Author of the 50 Shades Trilogy,.  and I followed this up with popular Australian author Liane Moriarty, who will be visiting Santa Cruz later this year.  My next stop on the tour is renowned children’s author Suzanne Collins, author of the Hunger Games Trilogy.  

Suzanne Collins

The next stop on our little website tour is that of Suzanne Collins.  Collins gained worldwide acclaim for her Hunger Games Trilogy, which was adapted into one of the most “tweeted-about” movies of all time and propelled Jennifer Lawrence to become a household name.  Her credentials are numerous, and are plastered all over her websites.  She became the darling of almost every major media outlet, and her books have a mass appeal that extends beyond her young adult target audience.  She hasn’t published any books since a picture book in 2013, but her books remain among Amazon’s top sellers.

Collins has a simple website, which particularly highlights The Hunger Games and The Underland Chronicles, two series that currently stand as her signature works.  With many reviews, including several on her home page, several more on a widget that rests to the right of each page, and oodles more that appear on each book’s individual page, Collins credibility as a writer is overwhelming.  What’s not overwhelming is her talent as a web designer.

The Good:

To borrow from Shakespeare, the books are the thing(s)!  If you live by this one mandate, then you’ll do well enough.  Collins and her webmaster provide ample space for the reviews, and these reviews are enough to attract any discerning reader.  To make a bad play on words, the website is a tribute to her abilities as a writer and as a story crafter.  These reviews come from a who’s who of newspapers and organizations, and each page starts with the numerous awards that her works have garnered.

Collins has personalized aspects of her site, such as humorous photos and an interview.  While her bio is written in the third person, I wouldn’t doubt that she was responsible for much of the content that went into her website.  Despite “the bad” below, that DIY, hands-on look appeals to me.

The Bad:

The general aesthetic of Collins’ website is dated.  No, it’s not dated in the sense that “that was 2013, this is 2017,” it’s dated in the sense that “that was Geocities circa 1999, and this is 2017.”  The website has a great deal of white space, but is packed along the right side, and most of the content on the main page is hidden below the fold.  The site generally lacks balance in that regard.  While technically there is nothing wrong with the site, and it is intuitive to navigate for most things, the lack of balance and the particular arrangement of white and peach make this site seem much older than it is.  Collins hadn’t emerged as a novelist when GeoCities was at its peak, so there is no reason why her site should have this GeoCities-like appearance.

This is a minor point, but there is not enough mention about what the books are about. I know, you’d have to be living under a rock to not know the general gist of the story.  Her works page provides a few sentences about each work, starting with When Charlie McButton Lost Power and moving all of the way up to Year of the Jungle.  However, these descriptions are, at best, the length of a description on the back cover.  Newer entrants in a given series receive fewer words and less concrete descriptions, to the point that the description for Mockingjay doesn’t really describe where the plot as much as it describes the general setting.

Verdict:

I am not for updating websites just for the sake of updating websites, but I think Collins could stand to improve her website and to bring it “up to date” with the present decade.  In terms of content, she has much of what she needs on the site itself, but the arrangement is lacking.

The one thing that I find particularly irksome about this site is that the site has outside links to websites that provide greater depth about Collins’ own content than what she has on her own site.  It makes me wonder if her publisher didn’t want her to have an in-depth site, so that people would be more likely to seek information about her books from other venues (such as the publisher’s site).

My favorite radio show describes things as either “hum baby” or “bum baby.”  Unfortunately, this site is very much a “bum baby.”

To view Ms. Collins’ website, please click here.

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